Q. What is a Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV) Test?

An NCV test is a test your doctor may order to measure nerve conduction and muscle action potential. These tests are performed to determine if symptoms (e.g. sciatica, weakness,) are caused by a nerve or muscle disorder. An NCV assesses how well a specific nerve conducts impulses by evaluating the speed and amplitude of an impulse as it travels along a nerve. This test can help determine if there is nerve damage, the exact location of the damage and the extent of the damage. These test results are imperative when considering treatment options.

Q. How do I prepare for the NCV test?

You should bathe on the day of your appointment. This will remove impurities and the body's natural oils and makes the test easier much easier to complete. Do not apply any oils or lotions to your skin the day of your test. Do not wear tight fitting clothes. You may be asked to roll your shirt sleeves or pant legs up past your elbows or knees. Wear clothing that will make this possible. Remove all jewelry from your hands and neck whenever possible. This includes rings, watches, bracelets and necklaces.

Q. Will I be able to drive myself home from the NCV test or can I go back to work?

You will be able to drive yourself to and from the test and you will be able to resume your normal work routine immediately after the test.

Q. Will I be able to drive myself home from the EMG test or can I go back to work?

You will be able to drive yourself to and from the test and you will be able to resume your normal work routine immediately after the test.

Q. What is an Electromyography (EMG) test?

An EMG test usually follows the NCV test and is often referred to as the needle examination. This part of the test involves some needle sticking. Needle electrodes (thin, fine, flexible and about one and a quarter inches long) are inserted in the relaxed muscle and moved inside gently in order to record the muscle activity. Usually 4 to 5 muscles are tested; however the initial findings may lead to other muscles being sampled in order to gain a complete understanding of the pathology in question.

Q. Does the EMG test hurt?

There is some mild discomfort when the needle is first inserted through the skin since all of the pain receptors are located in this area. Once the needle is introduced into the muscle, the patient usually perceives it as discomfort or pressure rather than pain.

Q. Does the EMG test hurt?

There is some mild discomfort when the needle is first inserted through the skin since all of the pain receptors are located in this area. Once the needle is introduced into the muscle, the patient usually perceives it as discomfort or pressure rather than pain.

Q. How should I prepare for the EMG test?

You should follow the same preparations listed for the NCV test. You will be asked if you are taking and blood thinners. If you are, please bring a list of medications with dosages.

Q. What is a Video EEG?

Your physician will often request a video EEG study. A video EEG study uses two wireless digital cameras aswell as the EEG computer. This allows the reading physician to see how the patient presents before, during and after an event by synchronized monitoring of both the patients' brainwaves and physical activity.

Q. What is a Routine EEG?

A routine EEG may be ordered for you. With a routine EEG, we will apply a number electrodes to your scalp. The electrodes will conect to a small head box that is attached to a computer. We will monitor your brain waves for a short period of time. The entire procedure will take about an hour to an hour and a half. An EEG is not painful, but you will be required to be still.

Q. What is an Ambulatory EEG?

Your physician may require more information than a routine EEG may be able to provide. It can be difficult to capture an “event” during the short time period of a routine EEG, as seizures and spells are often intermittent in nature. A large percentage of seizures or spells occur at night. In order to capture these events, or to monitor the discontinuation of medication, your physician may order an extended EEG. Extended EEG's may be done as an overnight study or until an event occurs. Physicians will typically order studies as overnight, 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours or until an event occurs.

Q. Why did my physician order an EEG?

Physcian's will typically order an EEG when a patient experiences a seizure or a spell, when there is an unclear diagnosis or has questions regarding the elimination of medications. The frequency of seizures in the general population is quite high at about 11%. The success of medical intervention for the treatment of seizures has been successful, but 35% of individuals experiencing seizures have failed to achieve seizure freedom.

Q. What should I do to prepare for an EEG?

It is important that your hair be very clean. Do not useconditioners, sprays or gels. For extended studies you should also wear a blouse or shirt that buttons or zippers so that you do not have pull anything over your head.